Slow Play (or Player)

It’s inevitable. Play tourneys long enough, you’re going to get paired with a sloth. Or behind one. Or both.
Listening to @jon ‘fess walking out midway thru a tourney; word bro.
Despite every effort, I can feel myself speeding up, just want the ordeal to end. I lose rhythm, focus and interest.
I realize it’s all in the bunker between my sideburns, but anyone have any tips?
Thx

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I walk in a less than straight line so I don’t get to my ball too soon. I walk to the right rough then do a u-turn and go to the left rough and go back and forth. There are also some places on my course where you can find lost balls. Instead of waiting on a tee I might go down a bank to recover some lost balls. Standing over your ball feeling frustration is not the situation you want to put yourself in.

Learn to be patient.
This was one of the virtue I had learned from this game when I was younger. Unless one has membership at an exclusive private golf clubs; the waiting on the public golf courses is facts of life we have to live with.
Why ? Because many of the new to the game learned how to golf on the public golf courses. I was one of them; even growing up with my father’s membership to many of the country clubs. I really did not pick up this game until much later. So I learned how to golf on the public golf courses, benefitted from the elderly golfers whom had taught me the rules and the etiquette.
I was a typical younger golfer, who liked to do everything fast and faster. The game of golf is designed like driving on a one way single lane roadway, no shoulders for passing.
I learned to enjoy the company a little more ( usually I’d walked on as a single to avoid spending more time arranging a group outing ). I learned to look around me ( stop and smell the roses ).
Most of all, I had learned to focus on demand; which is one of the tool a good golfer or for that matter, any good athlete will possess.
I learned to be more tolerate to those newbies who got paired up in my group. That was what we were taught in kindergarten, if we didn’t forget.
If I need to leave to get to my appointment, and I had to get on the golf course for the nice weather and the time slot I had available; I’d leave without finishing the 18, excuse myself when time ticked close to making my next appointment whenever the green was closer to the club house. Left the game on the back nine many times. A lot of times I was on track to break par but had to leave.
A friend who would take advantage of the twilight rate and running into some slow groups ahead of him, he would skip the group (s) and went ahead of them, then come back to finish the hole(s) he had finished the 18 many times if the day light allowed. Riding a golf cart would be much easier to do this maneuver, but be careful as you cut in front of some slow playing group; make certain the action is worth the effort and not disrupting others on the golf course. Meaning, if the whole golf course was packed with golfers, then , obviously this will not work.
Some golf courses will have Course Marshalls pushing the slower group of golfers mostly in the earlier tee time to make sure the whole day would not be back logged.
If I have slower golfer in the group, the faster golfers could move to the next tee after they finished putting instead of waiting as a group.
Sometimes a word of reminding or encouragement to the slower golfers in your group would do the magic. Be careful pf picking the right words and the right moment to do this; as misunderstanding could happen.

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Wish I did have some good tips for this! (Other than indulging in some swing juice / attitude enhancer / mood relaxer :crazy_face::rofl:)

But those ^ are all the same things that happen to me, and … I suspect … many others…

Actually just thought of one quote that may be helpful -
… from the inestimable Rory McIlroy: “Let your attitude influence your golf; don’t allow your golf to influence your attitude.”
:+1:

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That’s the real tricky bit!
Funny, when I’m playing whacks-n-giggles with mates (or strangers) there’s no problem. Then again, I don’t care that much either; it’s mostly camaraderie and the memory of the occasional shot that turns out exactly as planned. It could be said my focus is perpetually turned off for those outings.
It’s when I ‘have a dog in the hunt’ that my focus is always on, both during and between shots. Tough to turn off for 5 minutes then back on again for 20 seconds and still maintain performance but something I need to improve.

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This is down to expectations, as most frustrations are. If you can have the mind set that your round will be 4 1/2 to 5 hours then if its quicker you will feel pleased if not there will be less frustration.

We all get held up, its just part of the game as is controlling our emotions. As DJ said about bad shots, ‘you know you are going to hit some, so getting really worked up makes no sense’.

All easier said than done, takes some focus and practice, but hey, your playing golf so things are going pretty well in your life!

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This is what I try to keep in mind lately. I am still healthy enough and can afford to play golf. If this particular round is slower than usual or I’m playing worse, that’s not that big a deal. It can be tough to walk the line between being competitive and beating yourself up unless you remind yourself how lucky you are.

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It’s a learned skill; some were born with the gift and some will struggle with it.
Trevino could flip the light switch on/off at will, Nicklaus does not like to be disturbed when he is in the “zone”. Watson is a single minded focused on his current task; Hogan never talk to anyone much when he was in a round of tournament play. Palmer will shake hands, sign autograph, take pictures whenever he could.
Think of it this way, if a marathon runner runs a 10K, wouldn’t it seems to be an easier task?
For those who do not have the time or do not care to learn to focus on demand, then, it’s only a game; but learn to be patient. Unless one could join a private golf club and play during the weekdays.
There would be scarcely any golfers on the private golf courses during the weekdays.
Retired folks usually would like to golf different golf venues instead of a few.

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There are all kinds of players. I am a hit it, find it, hit it again kind of player. If I have to play out of a difficult situation that I put my own self in, I will take my time and evaluate my options. I walk most of the time, so I’m evaluating temperature, wind etc. as I am walking up to my ball. Now, when faced with slow play or I am trying to keep myself calm, I will slow my pace down… considerably! You can’t do that in a cart… I always hear my partners complain about waiting while they are sitting waiting, I’ll take my time, maybe ball-hawk in a penalty area taking my time to get to my ball. Hope that helps. If you’re in a cart…watch youtube :rofl:

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